K-9 Vest

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The Bryan Police K9 Sage has received a ballistic vest thanks to a non profit organization, Vested Interest in K9s, Inc. $16,595.00 was donated to the charity from the “K9 Kota Campaign” which will provide vests for seventeen K9s in KY, OH, NJ, CA and IN.
The “K9 Kota Campaign” held an online event selling over 1350 tee shirts for the cause.

K9 Kota is a law enforcement dog with the Winchester Police Department in VA who sustained a work related injury on January 3, 2014. He fell through an attic floor onto a hardwood floor while detaining a suspect. Although the injury was severe to his right front arm, Kota climbed back up the flight of stairs to continue the fight. After months of surgery and physical therapy his return to police work is still unknown.
Vested Interest in K9s, Inc. is a 501c (3) charity located in East Taunton, MA. Whose mission is to provide bullet and stab protective vests and other assistance to dogs of law enforcement and related agencies throughout the United States. Each vest costs $950.00 and has a 5 year warranty. The nonprofit was established in 2009 to assist law enforcement agencies with this potentially life saving body armor for their four legged K9 Officers. Through private and corporate sponsorships, Vested Interest in K9s, Inc. provided over 930 law enforcement dogs in 39 states with protective vests since 2009 at a cost of $880,000.

The organization orders the U.S. made vests exclusively from distributor Regency Police Supply in Hyannis, MA. who also does the custom embroidery on the body armor. Vests are manufacturer by Armor Express in Central Lake, MI.
New K9 graduates as well as K9’s with expired vests are eligible to participate. The program is open to law enforcement dogs who are US employed, certified and at least 19 months of age.

Vested Interest in K9s, Inc. was named as a charity partner in March of 2014 in a nation wide Groupon Campaign which raised over $335,000 in 19 days. The non profit will be providing over 350 law enforcement dogs nationwide with the protective body armor in memory of K9 Rocco of the Pittsburgh Police Department who sacrificed his life in the line of duty in January of 2014. All vests will be embroidered with the sentiment, “In Memory of K9 Rocco, Pittsburgh Police Department”.

For more information or to learn about volunteer opportunities, please call 508-824-6978. Tax deductible donations accepted via mail to: Vested Interest in K9s, Inc. P.O. Box 9 East Taunton, MA 02718 or via the website: http://www.vik9s.org.

SUMMERTIME IS PEAK TIME FOR THUNDER AND LIGHTNING STORMS

Lightning Safety Awareness Week is June 22-28

COLUMBUS, OH – In an annual coordinated effort with the National Weather Service, the Ohio Committee for Severe Weather Awareness promotes June 22-28 as Lightning Safety Awareness Week and encourages all Ohioans to know what to do before, during and after thunderstorms, and to practice severe weather safety and preparedness throughout the summer.

According to the National Weather Service (NWS), as of June 11, there have been five lightning fatalities this year: three in Florida; one in Texas and one in New Mexico. All were outside; one was near a body of water. A total of 23 people in 14 states died of lightning strikes in 2013 – no one from Ohio.

Although the number of lightning fatalities continues to decrease over the years, lightning strikes continue to be one of the top three storm-related killers in the United States. It is important to note that lightning injures more people than it kills. The best protection from lightning is to avoid the threat.

Performing this simple measure can dramatically reduce the chance of severe injury or death during a storm: When thunder roars, go indoors! Stop outdoor activities and seek shelter immediately.
Summertime is peak season for thunderstorm activity in Ohio. Preparedness for thunderstorms – or any severe weather incident – is key.

Be Informed. Know what to do before, during and after severe weather. For thunder and lightning safety tips, click on: http://www.ready.gov/thunderstorms-lightning

Make a Plan. Develop a disaster plan to respond to all hazards, including thunderstorms and lightning. Sign up for First Aid or CPR courses. Practice disaster plans by conducting safety drills.
Build a Kit. Organize or restock emergency supply kits for the home and vehicle to be prepared for any incident.

The NWS and Ohio Committee for Severe Weather Awareness also suggest the following lightning safety measures:

Watch for developing thunderstorms – Thunderstorms are most likely to develop on spring or summer days, but can also occur at night and during any season. Listen to local weather reports on radio or television stations. Know the difference between storm watches and warnings. Purchase a NOAA Weather Radio with tone alert that notifies when hazardous weather is in or near your area.

Seek shelter before an approaching thunderstorm – Lightning can strike as far as 10 miles away from where it’s raining. If you can hear thunder, you are within striking distance. Seek immediate shelter. Stay indoors for 30 minutes after hearing the last rumble of thunder. Continue to listen to a NOAA Weather Radio or local TV or radio newscasts for weather updates.

Protect your pets – Outside dog houses are not lightning-safe. Dogs that are chained to trees or wire runners have no protection from lightning. Bring your pets inside during thunderstorms.

Minimize your risk – Most lightning strikes occur during the summer when people are participating in outdoor recreational activities. At the first clap of thunder, stop outdoor activities and try to find indoor shelter immediately. If swimming, boating or fishing, get away from the water as quickly as possible. Find shelter in a substantial building (such as a home, school, office building or shopping center) or a hard-topped vehicle. Picnic shelters, car ports, baseball dugouts and convertible vehicles are not safe shelters during thunder and lightning storms. Do not use electrical equipment. Stay away from water/plumbing sources. Wait at least 30 minutes after the last sound of thunder before going outside again.

Helping someone struck by lightning – If a person is struck by lightning, call 911 and seek immediate medical attention. A lightning victim does not carry an electrical charge and is safe to touch. Knowing and implementing first aid measures, which include cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), can help a person struck by lightning survive. Local American Red Cross chapters and fire departments often offer first aid and CPR classes.

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For additional information on lightning safety, visit the Ohio Committee for Severe Weather Awareness site at http://www.weathersafety.ohio.gov or the NWS site at http://www.lightningsafety.noaa.gov.
OCSWA is comprised of 16 organizations and state agencies that are dedicated in teaching Ohioans severe weather safety and preparedness.
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Puppy Scam

The state’s attorney general is warning Ohioans to be on the alert for scams involving too-good-to-be-true offers for puppies or other pets for sale online.

Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine says his office has received more than 25 complaints in the last two years from consumers who said they paid for a dog or other pet they found online but never received. DeWine says the average loss of such scams is more than $1,000.

The attorney general says warning signs include a low cost for a dog of a popular or expensive breed and sellers who seek additional fees beyond the agreed-upon price. Consumers also should be wary of breeders communicating only online or via text message and of pets offered “free” to a good home.

Consumers should beware of the following red flags of a scam:

• Breeders who will communicate only online or via text message

• A low cost for a dog of a popular or expensive breed

• Sellers who ask for additional fees beyond the agreed-upon price

• Pets that are “free” to a good home

• Sellers who say they will refund the money once the puppy is delivered

• Shipping companies or couriers that keep contacting the consumer asking for more money

• Claims that there was an insufficient shipping container

To protect themselves from scams, consumers should deal with a local breeder who has a good reputation. They can check for complaints on file with the Ohio Attorney General’s Office and the Better Business Bureau, and they can seek information from animal adoption organizations. Consumers also should meet the puppy in person before sending any money.Image

Bryan Police Warns About The Dangers Of Heatstroke

Heatstroke is the number one killer of children, outside of car crashes. That’s why Bryan Police has joined with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) to attempt to reduce these deaths by reminding parents and caregivers about the dangers of heatstroke and leaving children in hot cars. Last year 44 children lost their lives nationwide.

“As outside temperatures rise, the risks of children dying from being left alone inside a hot vehicle also rises,” said Matt Arnold.

“One child dies from heatstroke nearly every 10 days from being left in a hot vehicle, but what is most tragic is that the majority of these deaths could have been prevented.“

Bryan Police urges all parents and caregivers to do these three things:

1) NEVER leave a child in a vehicle unattended;

2) Make it a habit to look in the backseat EVERY time you exit the car;

3) ALWAYS lock the car and put the keys out of reach. And, if you ever see a child left alone in a hot vehicle, call 911 right away.

Know the warning signs of heatstroke, which include: red, hot, and moist or dry skin; no sweating; a strong rapid pulse or a slow weak pulse; nausea; confusion; or acting strangely. If a child exhibits any of these signs after being in a hot vehicle, cool the child rapidly by spraying them with cool water or with a garden hose, NEVER an ice bath. Call 911 or your local emergency number immediately.

Children’s body temperatures can rise up to five times faster than that of an adult, and heatstroke can occur in temperatures as low as 57 degrees. On an 80-degree day, a car can reach deadly levels in just 10 minutes.

More than half of all vehicle-related heatstroke deaths in children are caused by a child accidentally being left in the car, and 29 percent are from a child getting into a hot car on their own.
“We want to get the word out to parents and caregivers, please look before you lock.”

Click It Or Ticket

Click It or Tcket It

The 2014 Click It or Ticket Click It or Ticket Enforcement Mobilization Cracking Down to Save Lives runs from May 19 – June 1.

The 2014 Click It or Ticket national enforcement mobilization is taking place all across the nation.
In 2012 seat belts saved an estimated 12,174 people from dying. From 2008 – 2012 seat belts saved nearly 63,000 lives.
In 2012, 3,031 additional lives could have been saved if all unrestrained passenger vehicle occupants 5 and older involved in fatal crashes had worn their seat belts.

Cops aren’t just cracking down for the fun of it. Wearing a seat belt is a serious issue.
For the first time in five years, fatalities for unrestrained passenger vehicle occupants have gone up. In 2012, there were 10,335 unbuckled passenger vehicle occupants who died. Because of these fatalities, cops are stepping up enforcement and cracking down on those who don’t wear their seat belts.

Too Many Motorists Are Dying

Young adults are dying at a disproportionate rate because they are not wearing their seat belts. Sixty-two percent of 18- to 34-year-old passenger vehicle occupants killed in crashes were not wearing their seat belts.

More men than women die every year in motor vehicle traffic crashes. In 2012, 65 percent of the 21,667 passenger vehicle occupants killed were men. Men also wore their seat belts less than women in fatal crashes – 56 percent of men were unrestrained, compared to 43 percent for women.

In 2012, 13,268 traffic fatalities occurred in rural locations, compared to 8,341 traffic fatalities that occurred in urban locations. Out of those fatalities, 54 percent of those not wearing their seatbelt were in rural locations, compared to 48 percent in urban locations.

People who live in rural areas might believe that the close-knit nature of their small town will get them out of a ticket. However, motorists should not think that knowing the officer who pulled them over will help them avoid a ticket. Cops are cracking down everywhere on those not wearing their seat belts.

Day or night, local law enforcement officers are on the lookout for those not wearing their seat belts–and for good reason. In 2012, 61 percent of passenger vehicle occupants killed at night (6 p.m. – 5:59 a.m.) were not wearing their seat belts.

FREE HEALTHY MEALS

Summer Food Rocks

Free Lunch

Free Healthy Meals for children 1-18 will be available June 9 through August 14, Monday through Friday, excluding July 4.

Pre-registration is not required.

In Bryan the meals will be served at Mattie Marsh Park, 410 East Trevitt Street. Lunch is served between 11:30 and 12:30 with fun activities scheduled between 12:00 and 12:45.

A second location will be held at Edgerton Village Offices, 324 N. Michigan. Lunch is served 11:45-12:30 with fun activities between 12:15 and 1:00.
Lunch prepared by Susie’s Lunch.

The summer food service program is sponsored by Northwestern Ohio Community Action Commission, with the USDA funding administered by the Ohio Department of Education.

Call Heidi Keween at 419-784-5136 or send an e-mail to hkeween@nocac.org for more information.

Bryan Police Department and Kerry Kazam the Safety Man

Washington School Bryan Ohio

Kerry Kazam the Safety Man

Washington School Bryan Ohio

Kerry Kazam the Safety Man

The Bryan Police Department and Kerry Kazam the Safety Man visited Lincoln, Washington and St. Pats schools in Bryan May 1 and 2.
Kerry Kazam (pictured) is from the National Child Safety Council and performed a magic child safety show for student’s preschool through fifth grade.
His show covered numerous topics including traffic, safety, 9-1-1, internet safety and bullies.