Category Archives: Drunk Driving

This Fourth of July, There’s No Excuse—

Bryan Ohio – Every year Americans head out on our nation’s highways to celebrate the Fourth of July at picnics, parties, parades and more. Unfortunately, for many, the celebrating includes drinking alcohol, which too often leads to drunk driving on one of the most heavily traveled holidays of the year.

There were 397 people killed in motor vehicle crashes in 2014 over the Fourth of July holiday (6 p.m. July 3rd to 5:59 a.m. July 7th). Of those fatalities, 164 people (41%) were killed in crashes involving a driver or motorcycle operator with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of .08 grams per deciliter (g/dL) or higher.

In 2014, 9,967 people were killed in drunk-driving crashes nationwide—almost a third of all crash fatalities.

And from 2010-2014, 39 percent of all traffic fatalities over the Fourth of July period occurred in alcohol-impaired-driving crashes.

In every state and the District of Columbia, it is illegal to drive with a BAC of .08 or higher. Yet, among the 164 people killed in drunk-driving crashes over the 2014 July Fourth period, 113 people died in crashes involving at least one driver or motorcycle operator with a BAC of .15 or higher—almost twice the set limit.

NHTSA data shows that young drivers (18 to 34 years old) are especially at risk of driving drunk. In fact, 58 percent of the drivers 18 to 34 years old who were killed over the July Fourth period in 2014 were driving drunk (BAC of .08 or higher). Motorcycle operators are also overrepresented as the highest percentage of alcohol-impaired drivers in fatal crashes. In 2014, more than a quarter (29%) of motorcycle operators in fatal crashes had BACs of .08 or higher.

Drunk drivers are also more common at night. Over the July Fourth holiday in 2014, more than two-fifths (42%) of the drivers in nighttime (6 p.m. to 5:59 a.m.) fatal crashes were alcohol-impaired, compared to 12 percent of drivers in fatal crashes during the day.

If you’re caught driving drunk this Independence Day, you will be arrested. The consequences of drunk driving are that serious. Not only could you put your life and the lives of others at risk, but a DUI arrest means a loss of freedom and money, including going to jail, losing your license, and paying steep financial expenses. The average DUI cost? About $10,000.

“This Fourth of July, don’t risk losing your life or your independence by drinking and driving. Help make everyone’s holiday in Bryan Ohio safer by driving sober, said Officer Matt Arnold “Remember,” Officer Arnold warned, there’s no excuse—Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over.”

Officer Matt Arnold recommends these safe alternatives to drinking and driving.

Plan a safe way home before the fun begins.
Designate a sober driver or use public transportation to get home safely.
Download NHTSA’s SaferRide mobile app at http://www.nhtsa.gov/link/saferride/.
If you see a drunk driver on the road, don’t hesitate to contact law enforcement
If you know people who are about to drive or ride after drinking, take their keys and help them make other arrangements to get to where they are going safely.

For more information about the Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over campaign, visit www.TrafficSafetyMarketing.gov.

 

 

 

 

KNOW YOUR ROLE ON SUPER BOWL 50

11875-586x126_superbowl-50-banners-100115-v15

Are You Drinking?

If so, don’t drive. Follow these tips to have fun, stay alive, and avoid getting pulled over or crashing your vehicle on game day.

  • Before Super Bowl Sunday, make a game plan that includes a sober driver – someone who will not be drinking at all.
  • Use NHTSA’s new SaferRide mobile app. The app helps people who have been drinking get a safe ride home by helping users call a taxi or a friend and by identifying their location so they can be picked up. The app is available for Android devices on Google Play, and Apple devices on the iTunes store.
  • Leave your keys at home and designate a sober driver.
  • Consider getting a sober ride – ride share or taxi – to your destination, so you won’t even have the option later to drive impaired.
  • Avoid drinking too much alcohol too fast. Pace yourself. Eat plenty of food, take breaks, and alternate with non-alcoholic drinks.
  • Stop drinking after the third quarter, just like they do at the actual stadium.
  • Make sure your designated driver is sober, not just less intoxicated than you.
  • Tweet your designated driver’s name to NHTSA to make their Wall of Fame.
  • Don’t let others drive drunk. Arrange a safe way for them to get home, too.
  • If you don’t have a designated driver, ask a sober friend for a ride home; book a ride share, call a cab, friend, or family member to come get you; or if possible stay where you are for the night and don’t drive until you are sober.
  • When you ride home with your sober driver, wear your seat belt. It’s your best defense in a crash.
  • Walking impaired can be dangerous. Designate a sober friend to walk you home.

Or Are You Driving?

If so, don’t drink. Your responsible choices can save lives.

  • Take your role seriously as the designated sober driver—don’t drink and drive.
  • Enjoy the party with food and non-alcoholic drinks.
  • Brag about your MVP status on social media using the hashtag #designateddriver.
  • Or during Super Bowl 50, tweet your name to NHTSA, and make their designated driver Wall of Fame.
  • Wear your seat belt and require your passengers to do the same.
  • If someone you know has been drinking and tries to drive, take their keys and help them get home safely. They’ll thank you later. Fans Don’t Let Fans Drive Drunk.

Are You Hosting a Super Bowl Party?

If so, you’re the team captain! Designate a responsible driver now to help your guests get home safely.

  • Ask all of your guests to designate their sober drivers in advance, or help them arrange ride-sharing with sober drivers. If you don’t drink, offer to drive guests home.
  • Encourage your drinking guests to pace themselves.
  • Serve plenty of food and non-alcoholic beverages at the party.
  • Stop serving alcohol at the end of the third quarter—this is a good time to serve coffee and dessert.
  • Thank the designated sober drivers at your party. You could even acknowledge them on social media using the hashtag #designateddriver.
  • Provide incentive—designated driver Wall of Fame.
  • Sign up online for a ride sharing service and keep the phone numbers of local cab companies on hand and take the keys away from any guests who are thinking of driving after drinking.
  • Remember, if you serve a guest alcohol and he or she gets in a crash that night, you could be held liable.
  • If an underage person drinks and drives, the parent or guardian can be legally liable for any damage, injury or death caused by the underage driver.
  • Likewise, parents or other adults who provide alcohol to – or host a party where alcohol is available to – those under age 21, could face jail time.

 

Are You Aware of the Risks? 

Drunk driving is a serious problem with serious consequences. Don’t become a Super Bowl stat.

  • In 2014 alone, 9,967 people were killed in alcohol-impaired-driving crashes, 31 percent of all crash fatalities.
  • An average of 1 alcohol-impaired-driving fatality occurred every 53 minutes in 2014.
  • Drunk drivers face jail time, the loss of their driver licenses, higher insurance rates, and dozens of other unanticipated expenses ranging from attorney fees, court costs, car towing and repairs, and lost wages due to time off from work.
  • The average DUI case costs approximately $10,000.
  • Refusing to take a breath test in many jurisdictions results in immediate arrest, the loss of your driver’s license on the spot and the impoundment of your vehicle. Also, there’s the added embarrassment, humiliation, and consequences of telling family, friends and employers of your arrest.
  • If you injure or kill someone in a drunk-driving crash, it’s something you’ll have to live with for the rest of your life.

Be a Saint. Drive Sober.

[Bryan Ohio]—St. Patrick’s Day brings to mind shamrocks, leprechauns, pots of gold, and good luck. But no amount of luck can save you from a drunk-driving crash. Unfortunately, March 17 has become a deadly day in the United States, with a dramatic spike in drunk-driving fatalities. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, during the St. Patrick’s Day weekend in 2013 (6 p.m., March 16 to 5:59 a.m., March 18), more than a third (40%) of all crash fatalities involved drunk drivers. The night of March 17—St. Patrick’s Day—was especially bad. In the post-celebration hours between midnight and 5:59 a.m. March 18, half of all crash fatalities involved drunk drivers. And we’re not just talking about a little bit too much to drink here; from 2009 to 2013, almost three-fourths of the drunk-driving fatalities on St. Patrick’s Day involved drivers who were twice the legal limit. So whether you’re buzzed or drunk on St. Patrick’s Day, it doesn’t matter. NHTSA wants to remind everyone that Buzzed Driving Is Drunk Driving—drive sober. In 2013, there were 31 people killed in drunk-driving crashes on St. Patrick’s Day. All in all, during the St. Patty’s Day period from 2009 to 2013, there have been 276 drunk-driving fatalities. Every one of those lives was lost because of bad decisions.

Bryan Police offered this advice to partygoers: “Get ahead of the decision this year. If you know you’re going to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day with alcohol, then figure out a plan ahead of time for how you’ll get home. Don’t wait until you’re too buzzed to decide, and don’t let your friends drive drunk.” Buzzed Driving Is Drunk Driving, so if you have anything to drink, count on a sober friend, taxi, or public transportation to drive you home safely. Not drinking? Maybe this St. Patrick’s Day, you’ll be the saint who drives your friends sober.

The bottom line is this: Too many Americans fail to designate sober drivers. NHTSA is working hard to make sure every driver knows the dangers of getting behind the wheel after drinking. According to NHTSA, in 2013 on average one person was killed every 52 minutes in a drunk-driving crash in the United States.  That totaled 10,076 drunk-driving fatalities that year. Let’s make 2015 different. Use this party-planning checklist to stay safe this St. Patrick’s Day.

NOW: Even if you don’t have plans yet, plan to drive sober or designate someone else to. Save the number of a taxi company in your phone so you always have a backup plan. 

WHEN YOU MAKE PLANS: A sober driver is an essential part of any party plan. Once you know where you’ll celebrate, decide whether you’re drinking or driving. You can only choose one.

ON ST. PATRICK’S DAY: Before you take your first sip of green beer, leave your keys at home or give them to a friend. If you’re the designated driver, don’t drink. Enjoy non-alcoholic beverages and brag about your VIP (very important partygoer) status online using the hashtag #designateddriver. Only drive sober or ride with a sober driver. Drunk driving has fatal consequences.

If you see a drunk driver on the road, contact local police immediately. You could save a life.

Buzzed-pr

Game Plan for Super Bowl Sunday: Are You Drinking or Driving? Fans Don’t Let Fans Drive Drunk

The Super Bowl is America’s most watched national sporting event. On Super Bowl Sunday, February 1, there will be lots of game day socializing that may include drinking. That’s why the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and law enforcement officials are urging football fans to choose sides now: drinking OR driving. If you plan on drinking on Super Bowl Sunday, designate a sober driver to get you home safely.

NHTSA’s Fans Don’t Let Fans Drive Drunk campaign encourages people to make plans ahead of time that will prevent them from getting behind the wheel of a vehicle after drinking. Driving impaired could result in injury or death for you or others on the road.

According to data from NHTSA, in 2012 there were 10,322 people killed in alcohol-impaired-driving crashes in the United States—31 percent of all crash fatalities in the nation. A driver is considered alcohol-impaired with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of .08 or higher, the legal limit in all states. This February 1, don’t become a tragic Super Bowl stat.

“Drunk driving is completely preventable,” said Matt Arnold of the Bryan Police Department. “All it takes is a little planning. We want fans to remember that it’s a choice. Drink or drive—but never do both.”

For those who plan to drink, leave your keys at home. Designate a sober driver, whether it’s a friend, relative, taxi, or public transportation. For those who plan to drive, refrain from any alcohol. Instead, enjoy the game with food and non-alcoholic drinks. Being a sober, designated driver is a key role on Super Bowl Sunday. You might just save a life.

Fans Don’t Let Fans Drive Drunk

Fans Don’t Let Fans Drive Drunk

Safe Ride Home

On New Year’s Eve from 9 p.m. to 2:30 a.m. volunteers from Grace Community Church will pick you up at any home, tavern, party, club or organization in Williams County Ohio and provide you a safe ride home to locations within Williams County Ohio.

Call 419-636-5449 for this free service.

Last year 50 people were provided with safe rides home on New Year’s Eve.

This program is sponsored by Grace Community Church in combined effort with WBNO-WQCT Radio, Williams County Safe Communities.

Every year more than 10,322 people are killed by drunk drivers in America.

Safety Advisory: Celebrating Halloween — Buzzed Driving is Drunk Driving Remember to ‘Think safe, ride safe, be safe!’ as Daylight Saving Time Ends

WASHINGTON – With the arrival of Halloween and the end of Daylight Saving Time, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is reminding Americans to drive safely, keep an eye out for trick-or-treaters, and to never drink and drive if you’ve celebrated with alcohol. As the clocks turn back this weekend on November 2, drivers and pedestrians should also be aware of the safety challenges that occur during the shorter days of fall and winter.

Drinking and increased pedestrian traffic on Halloween night has historically been a dangerous combination. On Halloween night in 2012, 54 people died, and nearly half of those deaths (26) involved a crash with a drunk driver, compared to one-third on an average day. More than one-quarter (28 percent) of Halloween crash fatalities were pedestrians, compared to 14 percent on an average day. From 2008-2012, 21 percent of pedestrian fatalities on Halloween night involved a drunk driver. For additional background, check out NHTSA’s October edition of Safety 1n Numb3rs.
Generally, evening hours are the deadliest time on the road, so drivers and pedestrians should be on guard with the end of Daylight Saving Time. In 2012, a pedestrian was killed every two hours and injured every seven minutes in traffic crashes. Most of these pedestrian deaths occur in urban environments, and the majority of pedestrian fatalities occur when it is dark, with 24 percent occurring from 4:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. and 32 percent occurring from 8:00 p.m. to midnight.

To stay safe, on Halloween, NHTSA offers the following tips:

For Motorists
◾Use caution while behind the wheel. ◾Slow down and be alert in residential areas.
◾Enter and exit driveways and alleys carefully.
◾Eliminate distractions so you can concentrate on the road and your surroundings.
◾Drive sober or get pulled over. ◾Always designate a sober driver and plan a way to safely get home at the end of the night if you plan on celebrating Halloween with alcohol.
◾Use your community’s sober ride program or take a taxi, call a sober friend or family member, or use public transportation.
◾If you see a drunk driver on the road, contact local law enforcement.
◾If you know someone who is about to drive or ride while impaired, take their keys and help them make safe travel arrangements to where they are going.

For Pedestrians
◾Walking impaired can be just as dangerous as drunk driving. Designate a sober friend to walk you home.
◾Help keep kids safe. ◾Children out at night and under the age of 12 should have adult supervision.
◾Kids should stick to familiar areas that are well lit and trick-or-treat in groups.
◾Choose face paint when possible instead of masks, which can obstruct a child’s vision.
◾Decorate costumes with reflective tape and have kids carry glow sticks or flashlights.
◾Always cross the street at corners, using traffic signals and crosswalks, and look left, right and left again when crossing and keep looking as you cross.

NHTSA also offers the following tips for motorist and pedestrian safety during the shorter days of fall and winter:

For Motorists
◾Slow down. During the evening hours, you need more time to see a pedestrian in your path.
◾Keep in mind that pedestrians who are wearing headphones, hats or earmuffs may not hear your vehicle as it approaches.
◾Keep your windshield, windows, and mirrors clean. Make sure your defrosters and windshield wipers are working properly and that washer fluid is replaced as needed.

For Pedestrians
◾Carry a flashlight or attach reflective materials – such as fluorescent tape – to clothing, backpacks, purses, and briefcases.
◾Don’t depend on the traffic signal to protect you. Motorists may be distracted, especially when adjusting to the nighttime travel environment.
◾Use crosswalks. Avoid jaywalking and crossing between parked vehicles.
◾Walk on sidewalks whenever possible. If you must walk on the street, face traffic.
◾When crossing the street, look left-right-left for cars from the curb.
◾Do not cross the street if a car is coming and use a crosswalk if available.
◾Watch out for cars at every driveway and intersection.
◾Pay attention to what is happening on the road and avoid distractions.

Super Bowl XLVIII – February 2, 2014

The Super Bowl is one of America’s most highly anticipated sports events, when friends and family gather in homes, bars and restaurants to celebrate. As Super Bowl Sunday approaches and football fans across the country prepare for the game, the U.S. Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), along with the National Football League (NFL) and Techniques for Effective Alcohol Management (TEAM) Coalition, have joined forces with local highway safety and law enforcement officials to spread the message about designating a sober driver on Super Bowl Sunday, because – Fans Don’t Let Fans Drive Drunk.

According to NHTSA, in 2011, 9,878 people were killed in alcohol-impaired-driving crashes. These crashes were 31 percent more likely to occur on weekends than on weekdays.

Whether attending the game, watching at a bar or hosting a party, NHTSA, TEAM Coalition, the NFL and Bryan Police Department remind everyone that Fans Don’t Let Fans Drive Drunk. Before choosing to drink, choose your team’s MVP – a sober designated driver. NHTSA offers these additional safety tips:

If you’re attending a Super Bowl party or watching the game at a sports bar or restaurant:

 Designate your sober driver, or plan another way to get home safely before the party begins.

 If you don’t have a designated driver, then ask a sober friend for a ride home; call a cab, friend, or family member to come and get you; or just stay for the night.

 Use your community’s sober ride program.

 Never let friends drive if they have had too much to drink.

If you’re hosting a Super Bowl party:

 Make sure all your guests designate a sober driver in advance, or arrange for alternate transportation to ensure they get home safely.

 Serve food and include non-alcoholic beverages at the party.

 Stop serving alcohol at the end of the third quarter of the game and begin serving coffee and dessert.

 Keep the numbers for local cab companies handy, and take the keys away from anyone who has had too much to drink.