Category Archives: Police

Ohioans Report Police and Fire Scams

7/22/2016

(COLUMBUS, Ohio)—Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine today warned that several Ohioans have reported receiving suspicious calls asking for donations supposedly to support police and fire causes.

The calls reportedly ask consumers to give money to support wounded police officers and firefighters, underfunded departments, scholarship funds for families of officers, or similar causes. Consumers say the callers refuse to answer questions or to provide viable call-back numbers.

The calls appear to come from Ohio phone numbers, but the numbers could be spoofed or the calls could be made over the Internet, meaning the caller could be located somewhere else entirely.

“Charity scams take money away from legitimate organizations,” Attorney General DeWine said. “While we encourage people to be generous, we also encourage them to be cautious. A little research can go a long way. If you get a call asking for a donation, check it out to make sure it’s not a scam.”

Signs of a potential charity scam include callers who:

  • Make vague claims about a cause.
  • Use a name similar to a well-known organization.
  • Provide little or no detailed information.
  • Refuse to answer questions.
  • Refuse to provide a call-back number.
  • Use a “spoofed” phone number.
  • Demand immediate payment.
  • Ask for payment via wire transfer or prepaid card.
  • Ask for payment to an individual instead of an organization.

Not all calls seeking charitable donations are potential scams. Legitimate charities and professional solicitors, which generally are for-profit businesses paid to collect donations, can and do seek donations over the phone. When a charitable organization calls a consumer seeking a donation, the caller must provide the name of the organization and the location of its principal place of business. Professional solicitors also must provide this basic information.

The Ohio Attorney General’s Charitable Law Section maintains a registry of charitable organizations and professional solicitors that raise money in Ohio. Both must annually file informational returns or financial reports with the Attorney General’s Office. The Attorney General also investigates alleged fraud and takes legal action to protect charitable funds.

To determine whether an organization has registered with the Ohio Attorney General’s Office or to report suspicious charitable activity, contact the Ohio Attorney General’s Office at 800-282-0515 or www.OhioAttorneyGeneral.gov.

This Fourth of July, There’s No Excuse—

Bryan Ohio – Every year Americans head out on our nation’s highways to celebrate the Fourth of July at picnics, parties, parades and more. Unfortunately, for many, the celebrating includes drinking alcohol, which too often leads to drunk driving on one of the most heavily traveled holidays of the year.

There were 397 people killed in motor vehicle crashes in 2014 over the Fourth of July holiday (6 p.m. July 3rd to 5:59 a.m. July 7th). Of those fatalities, 164 people (41%) were killed in crashes involving a driver or motorcycle operator with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of .08 grams per deciliter (g/dL) or higher.

In 2014, 9,967 people were killed in drunk-driving crashes nationwide—almost a third of all crash fatalities.

And from 2010-2014, 39 percent of all traffic fatalities over the Fourth of July period occurred in alcohol-impaired-driving crashes.

In every state and the District of Columbia, it is illegal to drive with a BAC of .08 or higher. Yet, among the 164 people killed in drunk-driving crashes over the 2014 July Fourth period, 113 people died in crashes involving at least one driver or motorcycle operator with a BAC of .15 or higher—almost twice the set limit.

NHTSA data shows that young drivers (18 to 34 years old) are especially at risk of driving drunk. In fact, 58 percent of the drivers 18 to 34 years old who were killed over the July Fourth period in 2014 were driving drunk (BAC of .08 or higher). Motorcycle operators are also overrepresented as the highest percentage of alcohol-impaired drivers in fatal crashes. In 2014, more than a quarter (29%) of motorcycle operators in fatal crashes had BACs of .08 or higher.

Drunk drivers are also more common at night. Over the July Fourth holiday in 2014, more than two-fifths (42%) of the drivers in nighttime (6 p.m. to 5:59 a.m.) fatal crashes were alcohol-impaired, compared to 12 percent of drivers in fatal crashes during the day.

If you’re caught driving drunk this Independence Day, you will be arrested. The consequences of drunk driving are that serious. Not only could you put your life and the lives of others at risk, but a DUI arrest means a loss of freedom and money, including going to jail, losing your license, and paying steep financial expenses. The average DUI cost? About $10,000.

“This Fourth of July, don’t risk losing your life or your independence by drinking and driving. Help make everyone’s holiday in Bryan Ohio safer by driving sober, said Officer Matt Arnold “Remember,” Officer Arnold warned, there’s no excuse—Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over.”

Officer Matt Arnold recommends these safe alternatives to drinking and driving.

Plan a safe way home before the fun begins.
Designate a sober driver or use public transportation to get home safely.
Download NHTSA’s SaferRide mobile app at http://www.nhtsa.gov/link/saferride/.
If you see a drunk driver on the road, don’t hesitate to contact law enforcement
If you know people who are about to drive or ride after drinking, take their keys and help them make other arrangements to get to where they are going safely.

For more information about the Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over campaign, visit www.TrafficSafetyMarketing.gov.

 

 

 

 

Distracted Driving

WreckItAllLogo With ever increasing demands on our personal and professional time in today’s busy society, learning to juggle multiple tasks at once is something we all face daily. As a result, a new traffic safety epidemic has emerged on America’s roadways that demand immediate attention: distracted driving.

In 2014, 3,179 people were killed in crashes involving a distracted driver. One of the most alarming and widespread forms of distracted driving is cell phone usage. According to a study by the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute (VTTI), sending or receiving a text takes a driver’s eyes off the road for an average of 5 seconds, the equivalent of driving blind at 55-mph for the length of an entire football field. And a 2014 special article in the New England Journal of Medicine found that the risk of a crash or near-crash among novice drivers increased with the performance of many secondary tasks, including texting and dialing cell phones.

Text messaging is of heightened concern because it combines three types of distraction – visual, manual and cognitive. In other words, texting involves taking your eyes off the road, your hands off the wheel, and your mind off the task of driving.

To tackle this ever-increasing problem, NHTSA is focusing on ways to change the behavior of drivers through legislation, enforcement, public awareness and education—the same tactics that have curbed drinking and driving and increased seat belt use.

NHTSA’s message is simple – “One Text or Call Could Wreck it All.” With supporters ranging from President Obama to Adam Levine and legislation being passed across the nation to discourage distracted driving, we hope drivers get the message loud and clear.

So the next time you are pressed for time, and it seems like multitasking in the car is the best decision, remember those 3,179 lives that were taken because someone decided they could do two things at once. A text or call is not worth your life, or anyone else’s.

 

 

 

POLICE/FIRE DISPATCHER

POLICE/FIRE DISPATCHER

The Bryan Police Department is accepting applications for part-time Police/Fire Dispatcher until April 8th at 4:00 PM. Applicants must be at least 18 years of age, pass medical exam and thorough background investigation, including lie detector. Starting wage will be $10.00/hr. Application packets are available at the Bryan Police & Fire Complex, 304 West High Street, Bryan, OH 43506. (28)

 

KNOW YOUR ROLE ON SUPER BOWL 50

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Are You Drinking?

If so, don’t drive. Follow these tips to have fun, stay alive, and avoid getting pulled over or crashing your vehicle on game day.

  • Before Super Bowl Sunday, make a game plan that includes a sober driver – someone who will not be drinking at all.
  • Use NHTSA’s new SaferRide mobile app. The app helps people who have been drinking get a safe ride home by helping users call a taxi or a friend and by identifying their location so they can be picked up. The app is available for Android devices on Google Play, and Apple devices on the iTunes store.
  • Leave your keys at home and designate a sober driver.
  • Consider getting a sober ride – ride share or taxi – to your destination, so you won’t even have the option later to drive impaired.
  • Avoid drinking too much alcohol too fast. Pace yourself. Eat plenty of food, take breaks, and alternate with non-alcoholic drinks.
  • Stop drinking after the third quarter, just like they do at the actual stadium.
  • Make sure your designated driver is sober, not just less intoxicated than you.
  • Tweet your designated driver’s name to NHTSA to make their Wall of Fame.
  • Don’t let others drive drunk. Arrange a safe way for them to get home, too.
  • If you don’t have a designated driver, ask a sober friend for a ride home; book a ride share, call a cab, friend, or family member to come get you; or if possible stay where you are for the night and don’t drive until you are sober.
  • When you ride home with your sober driver, wear your seat belt. It’s your best defense in a crash.
  • Walking impaired can be dangerous. Designate a sober friend to walk you home.

Or Are You Driving?

If so, don’t drink. Your responsible choices can save lives.

  • Take your role seriously as the designated sober driver—don’t drink and drive.
  • Enjoy the party with food and non-alcoholic drinks.
  • Brag about your MVP status on social media using the hashtag #designateddriver.
  • Or during Super Bowl 50, tweet your name to NHTSA, and make their designated driver Wall of Fame.
  • Wear your seat belt and require your passengers to do the same.
  • If someone you know has been drinking and tries to drive, take their keys and help them get home safely. They’ll thank you later. Fans Don’t Let Fans Drive Drunk.

Are You Hosting a Super Bowl Party?

If so, you’re the team captain! Designate a responsible driver now to help your guests get home safely.

  • Ask all of your guests to designate their sober drivers in advance, or help them arrange ride-sharing with sober drivers. If you don’t drink, offer to drive guests home.
  • Encourage your drinking guests to pace themselves.
  • Serve plenty of food and non-alcoholic beverages at the party.
  • Stop serving alcohol at the end of the third quarter—this is a good time to serve coffee and dessert.
  • Thank the designated sober drivers at your party. You could even acknowledge them on social media using the hashtag #designateddriver.
  • Provide incentive—designated driver Wall of Fame.
  • Sign up online for a ride sharing service and keep the phone numbers of local cab companies on hand and take the keys away from any guests who are thinking of driving after drinking.
  • Remember, if you serve a guest alcohol and he or she gets in a crash that night, you could be held liable.
  • If an underage person drinks and drives, the parent or guardian can be legally liable for any damage, injury or death caused by the underage driver.
  • Likewise, parents or other adults who provide alcohol to – or host a party where alcohol is available to – those under age 21, could face jail time.

 

Are You Aware of the Risks? 

Drunk driving is a serious problem with serious consequences. Don’t become a Super Bowl stat.

  • In 2014 alone, 9,967 people were killed in alcohol-impaired-driving crashes, 31 percent of all crash fatalities.
  • An average of 1 alcohol-impaired-driving fatality occurred every 53 minutes in 2014.
  • Drunk drivers face jail time, the loss of their driver licenses, higher insurance rates, and dozens of other unanticipated expenses ranging from attorney fees, court costs, car towing and repairs, and lost wages due to time off from work.
  • The average DUI case costs approximately $10,000.
  • Refusing to take a breath test in many jurisdictions results in immediate arrest, the loss of your driver’s license on the spot and the impoundment of your vehicle. Also, there’s the added embarrassment, humiliation, and consequences of telling family, friends and employers of your arrest.
  • If you injure or kill someone in a drunk-driving crash, it’s something you’ll have to live with for the rest of your life.

Attorney General DeWine Warns Consumers to Avoid Lottery Scams as Jackpot Rises

scam(COLUMBUS, Ohio)—Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine today warned consumers to avoid lottery and sweepstakes scams as the estimated Powerball jackpot hits $800 million.

In the past month, the Ohio Attorney General’s Consumer Protection Section has received more than two dozen complaints involving sweepstakes or prize scams. The average reported loss is about $5,000.

“If you receive a call saying you’ve won the lottery, it’s almost always a scam,” Attorney General DeWine said. “Con artists play on what’s in the news, so we’re warning people to be wary of scams as the Powerball jackpot grows.”

The scams often begin with a phone call or a letter claiming the consumer has won a few million dollars through a lottery or sweepstakes. In order to collect the winnings, consumers are told to wire a few hundred or a few thousand dollars to cover fees or taxes. In reality, they haven’t won a prize, and any money they send will be lost.

Individuals who send money once usually will be contacted again and asked to send more money to cover taxes, customs fees, or other costs supposedly associated with delivering the winnings. As long as the victim continues to send money, the scam artist will keep calling.

Signs of a lottery scam include:

  • Winning a lottery you don’t remember entering.
  • Receiving calls from a lottery or government agency saying you’ve won millions.
  • Receiving an unexpected check for a few thousand dollars.
  • Having to pay a fee to collect your winnings.
  • Having to send money via wire transfer or prepaid card.

Attorney General DeWine encourages consumers to take the following steps to avoid scams:

  • Be very skeptical of someone who calls you and says you’ve won the lottery. These calls are almost always scams.
  • Don’t wire money or pay a fee to receive your winnings.
  • Don’t give out your personal information to someone who contacts you unexpectedly over the phone or through email.
  • Be skeptical if you are asked to call an out-of-country phone number in connection with a lottery or sweepstakes win.
  • Be skeptical if you receive an unexpected check for a few thousand dollars. It could be a counterfeit check used as part of a scam.
  • If you have older relatives or friends, look for signs that they have been targeted by lottery scams. Red flags include unusual banking activities, wire transfer receipts, or an increased number of phone calls made to them.

Consumers should report potential scams to the Ohio Attorney General’s Office at www.OhioAttorneyGeneral.gov or by calling 800-282-0515.

Drowsy Driving – Who’s Most at Risk?

Anyone who drives is at risk of falling asleep at the wheel, but some groups of people are more at risk than others. They include:

• Young drivers – Combining inexperience with
sleepiness and a tendency to drive at night
puts young people at risk, especially males
aged 16-25 years.

• Shift workers and people working long
hours – People who work night shifts,
rotating shifts, double shifts or work more
than one job have a six-fold increase in drowsy
driving crashes.

• Commercial drivers – Those who drive a high
number of miles and drive at night are at
significantly higher risk for fall-asleep crashes.
Commercial drivers have also been found to
be at a high risk for sleep disorders.

• People with untreated sleep disorders
such as obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) –
People with untreated OSA are up to seven
times more likely to have a drowsy driving
crash. For some people insomnia can
increase fatigue.

• Business travelers – Frequent travelers who
may be suffering from jet lag and crossing time
zones, spending long hours behind the wheel
or getting too little sleep.
continued

Facts About Drowsy Driving
DDPW_banner_2http://www.DrowsyDriving.org