Fireworks Safety

Recommended Safety Tips

  • Obey all local laws regarding the use of fireworks.
  • Know your fireworks; read the cautionary labels and performance descriptions before igniting.
  • A responsible adult SHOULD supervise all firework activities. Never give fireworks to children.
  • Alcohol and fireworks do not mix. Save your alcohol for after the show.
  • Wear safety glasses when shooting fireworks.
  • Light one firework at a time and then quickly move away.
  • Use fireworks OUTDOORS in a clear area; away from buildings and vehicles.
  • Never relight a “dud” firework. Wait 20 minutes and then soak it in a bucket of water.
  • Always have a bucket of water and charged water hose nearby.
  • Never carry fireworks in your POCKET or shoot them into METAL or GLASS containers.
  • Do not experiment with homemade fireworks.
  • Dispose of spent fireworks by wetting them down and place in a metal trash can away from any building or combustible materials until the next day.
  • FAA regulations PROHIBIT the possession and transportation of fireworks in your checked baggage or carry-on luggage.
  • Report illegal explosives, like M-80s and quarter sticks, to the fire or police department

K-9 Sage Demonstrartion

The Bryan Police K-9 Sage is scheduled to be at Tractor Supply Company 1120 South Main Street Bryan Ohio as part of Purina Days on Saturday May 30 at 11 a.m.  Come down and watch a K-9 demonstration, see the new K-9 unit nicknamed Sage Coach and talk to Cory Nichols the K-9 Handler.

The K-9 demonstration is just one of the many events scheduled. For additional event information call the store at 419-633-0409.

sage and ram

Trunk Entrapment

Trunk

Children are naturally curious and love to explore their surroundings. So, if you leave your kids unattended, in or near a vehicle, it won’t be long before they are playing in it. Hide and seek can turn deadly if they get trapped in the trunk, where temperatures can rise very quickly – resulting in heatstroke or asphyxiation.

Prevention Tips

  • Teach children that vehicle trunks are for cargo, not for playing.
  • Always supervise your children carefully when in and around vehicles.
  • Check the trunk right away if your child is missing.
  • Lock your car doors and trunk and be sure keys and remote entry devices are out of sight and reach of your kids.
  • Keep the rear fold-down seats closed/locked to keep your children from climbing into the trunk from inside your car.

Retrofit Your Car

As of September 1, 2001, auto manufacturers were required to equip all new vehicle trunks with a ‘glow in the dark’ trunk release inside the trunk compartment. Show your kids how to use the release in case of an emergency. If your car is older and does not have the ‘glow in the dark’ trunk release, ask your automobile dealership about getting your vehicle retrofitted with a trunk release mechanism.

What You Need To Know, Now.

  • Younger children are more sensitive to heat than older children and adults, and are at greater risk for heatstroke.
  • High temperature, humidity and poor ventilation create an extremely dangerous environment in a vehicle trunk.
  • Check the trunk right away if your child is missing.
  • Even in cooler temperatures, your vehicle can heat up to dangerous temperatures very quickly. An outside temperature in the mid 60s can cause a vehicle’s inside temperature to rise above 110 degrees Fahrenheit. The inside temperature of your car can rise almost 20 degrees Fahrenheit within the first 10 minutes.

Information from the Safercar.gov

Ohio Attorney General Offering tips for charitable giving following Nepal earthquake

Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine is offering tips for secure charitable donations in the wake of the Nepal earthquake that killed more than 4,000 people.
Attorney General DeWine is encouraging charity in this time of need, but also wants Ohio residents to be on the look out for charity scams.

Signs of a potential charity scam include high-pressure tactics, a refusal to provide written information about the charity and requests for checks made payable to a person instead of a charity.

Individuals who want to make charitable donations online should follow remember the following:

-If you receive a text message or email asking for a donation, confirm that the request is from the charity by contacting the charity or visiting its website.

-Check with resources such as the Ohio Attorney General’s Office, IRS, and GuideStar to find information about a charitable organization.

-Be cautious of lookalike websites. Some scam artists may set up websites that appear to be legitimate charity websites in order to gain your personal or financial information.

-Don’t assume that charity recommendations on social media have been properly vetted. Research the charity yourself.

Donors should be cautious with new charities formed shortly after a tragedy. While the organization may have good intentions, it may not have enough experience to quickly respond to a situation. You may want to donate to an established organization that has a proven track record in assisting with international relief efforts.

Individuals who suspect questionable charitable activity or who want to find additional tips should contact the Ohio Attorney General’s Office at www.OhioAttorneyGeneral.gov or 800-282-0515.

April Is National Distracted Driving Awareness Month

Enforcement, awareness effort aims to save thousands killed in distraction-related crashes

WASHINGTON – U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx today kicked off Distracted Driving Awareness month, which began April 1, by announcing the “U Drive. U Text. U Pay.” National Distracted Driving Enforcement Campaign. From April 10-15, state and local law enforcement will aggressively ticket drivers who are texting or using their mobile devices when behind the wheel. The Secretary made the announcement in Washington, D.C., where young drivers demonstrated the dangers of distracted driving on a temporary test track. Secretary Foxx was joined by Mark Rosekind, Administrator of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

“Distracted driving kills, there is no excuse for it, and it must stop,” said Secretary Foxx. “Across the country, we’re putting distracted drivers on notice: U Drive. U Text. U Pay. Texting and driving will at least cost you the price of a ticket but it could very well cost you your life or someone else’s.”

Based on fatal accident reports, NHTSA data shows that at least 3,154 people were killed in crashes involving all distracted drivers in 2013, including those who were texting and driving. NHTSA estimates that 424,000 Americans were injured in all distraction-affected crashes in 2013.

Key statistical findings in NHTSA’s new Distracted Driving Traffic Safety Facts and Teen Distracted Driver fact sheet include:
◾Ten percent of fatal crashes, 18 percent of injury crashes, and 16 percent of all motor vehicle traffic crashes in 2013 were reported as distraction-affected crashes, which are defined as any crash in which a driver was identified as distracted at the time of the crash.
◾Ten percent of all drivers 15 to 19 years old involved in fatal crashes were reported as distracted at the time of the crashes. This age group has the largest proportion of drivers who were distracted at the time of the crash.
◾244 Americans aged 15 to 19 were killed in distraction-affected crashes.
◾In 2013, there were 480 non-occupants killed in distraction-affected crashes.

“Young people need to understand the dangers of texting and driving before it kills them or someone they love,” said Administrator Rosekind. “It’s up to us as parents to set the right example by never texting and driving ourselves, and by laying down the law for our young drivers: no texting behind the wheel or no keys to the car. These are driving safety lessons that young drivers will carry with them throughout their lives.”

The awareness effort is supported by a $5 million national television, radio and digital advertising campaign, which runs from April 6-15, and reminds the public of the deadly consequences of distracted driving, and the financial penalties for violating state distracted driving laws. Ads will run in English and Spanish.

Forty-five states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam and the U.S. Virgin Islands ban text messaging for drivers of all ages; 14 states and territories prohibit drivers of all ages from using hand-held cell phones while driving; and 38 states plus the District of Columbia ban cell phone use by novice drivers. Two states, Oklahoma and Texas, restrict school bus drivers from texting.

To prevent distracted driving, motorists are urged to:
◾Turn off electronic devices and put them out of reach before starting to drive.
◾Be good role models for young drivers and set a good example. Talk with your teens about responsible driving.
◾Speak up when you are a passenger and your driver uses an electronic device while driving. Offer to make the call for the driver, so his or her full attention stays on the driving task.
◾Always wear your seat belt. Seat belts are the best defense against other unsafe drivers.

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Ohioans Report Scam Calls from “911”

Callers Threaten Consumers with Legal Action and Demand Immediate Response

(COLUMBUS, Ohio)—Attorney General Mike DeWine today warned Ohioans about scam calls that appear to come from the phone number “911” and instruct consumers to contact the Attorney General’s Office to avoid arrest or legal action.

DeWine’s office has received approximately 20 reports of the scam in 2015, with most filed this month.

The scam begins when consumers receive a phone call that displays “911” on their caller ID. When they answer the call, consumers are told that a warrant will be issued for their arrest or a lawsuit will be filed against them unless they contact the Attorney General’s Office immediately using a number provided by the caller.

In reality, the calls are not coming from the Ohio Attorney General’s Office or from 911 dispatchers.

“This appears to be a phone scam designed to scare consumers into providing money or personal information,” Attorney General DeWine said. “If you receive one of these calls, don’t respond to it and don’t dial the number the caller provides. Instead, hang up and report the call to my office.”

Recent reports of the 911-caller ID scams have come from consumers in Butler, Clinton, Cuyahoga, Erie, Fairfield, Franklin, Hamilton, Huron, Lake, Lorain, Lucas, Mahoning, Montgomery, Seneca, Stark, Summit, and Union counties, but additional consumers likely have been affected.

Although “911” appears on the consumer’s caller ID, that number is likely spoofed — meaning a scammer has manipulated the consumer’s caller ID to make it seem as if the call is coming from emergency personnel or law enforcement while concealing the true origin of the call.

To protect themselves from phone scams, consumers should:
•Be skeptical of the phone number that appears on caller ID. It could be spoofed.
•When in doubt, hang up or don’t answer a call.
•Don’t respond to suspicious calls. Even if the call prompts you dial a certain number to avoid arrest or to press a button to “opt out,” don’t do it. This could cause you to receive more calls, because it signals that yours is a legitimate phone number.
•Never provide money or personal information to someone who calls you unexpectedly and demands payment, even if it appears to be an emergency call or a call from the government.
•Don’t trust someone who says you have to pay off a debt by using a prepaid card or wire transfer. These are preferred payment methods for scam artists, because once the money is sent, it is difficult to trace or recover.
scam

Ohio Move Over Law

4511.213 Approaching stationary public safety vehicle displaying emergency light.

(A) The driver of a motor vehicle, upon approaching a stationary public safety vehicle, emergency vehicle, road service vehicle, vehicle used by the public utilities commission to conduct motor vehicle inspections in accordance with sections 4923.04 and 4923.06 of the Revised Code, or a highway maintenance vehicle that is displaying the appropriate visual signals by means of flashing, oscillating, or rotating lights, as prescribed in section 4513.17 of the Revised Code, shall do either of the following:

(1) If the driver of the motor vehicle is traveling on a highway that consists of at least two lanes that carry traffic in the same direction of travel as that of the driver’s motor vehicle, the driver shall proceed with due caution and, if possible and with due regard to the road, weather, and traffic conditions, shall change lanes into a lane that is not adjacent to that of the stationary public safety vehicle, emergency vehicle, road service vehicle, vehicle used by the public utilities commission to conduct motor vehicle inspections in accordance with sections 4923.04 and 4923.06 of the Revised Code, or a highway maintenance vehicle.

(2) If the driver is not traveling on a highway of a type described in division (A)(1) of this section, or if the driver is traveling on a highway of that type but it is not possible to change lanes or if to do so would be unsafe, the driver shall proceed with due caution, reduce the speed of the motor vehicle, and maintain a safe speed for the road, weather, and traffic conditions.

(B) This section does not relieve the driver of a public safety vehicle, emergency vehicle, road service vehicle, vehicle used by the public utilities commission to conduct motor vehicle inspections in accordance with sections 4923.04 and 4923.06 of the Revised Code, or a highway maintenance vehicle from the duty to drive with due regard for the safety of all persons and property upon the highway.

(C) No person shall fail to drive a motor vehicle in compliance with division (A)(1) or (2) of this section when so required by division (A) of this section.

(D)

(1) Except as otherwise provided in this division, whoever violates this section is guilty of a minor misdemeanor. If, within one year of the offense, the offender previously has been convicted of or pleaded guilty to one predicate motor vehicle or traffic offense, whoever violates this section is guilty of a misdemeanor of the fourth degree. If, within one year of the offense, the offender previously has been convicted of two or more predicate motor vehicle or traffic offenses, whoever violates this section is guilty of a misdemeanor of the third degree.

(2) Notwithstanding section 2929.28 of the Revised Code, upon a finding that a person operated a motor vehicle in violation of division (C) of this section, the court, in addition to all other penalties provided by law, shall impose a fine of two times the usual amount imposed for the violation.

Amended by 130th General Assembly File No. 57, SB 137, §1, eff. 12/19/2013.

Effective Date: 01-01-2004; 2009 HB2 07-01-2009

Related Legislative Provision: See 130th General Assembly File No. 57, SB 137, §4.